Things to Know about Service Dogs

Our dogs deserve all the Dog Toys in the world because they are that awesome! Capable of learning many new things, dogs can be trained as service animals. These canines are defined by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), as dogs trained to perform specific tasks based on their handlers’ disabilities. These tasks can range from retrieving things to placing 911 calls in emergencies.

However, we should keep in mind that service dogs are not pets. Unlike our domestic buddies, these dogs have been specially trained. They are also different from emotional support dogs. The ADA decrees that since a service dog is necessary for an individual’s survival in adverse conditions, they cannot be denied entrance to most public places. Those include restaurants, businesses, nonprofit organizations, and state and local government facilities. Additionally, they cannot be harnessed in a way that prevents them from performing their duties.

The following are just some examples of the different types of service dogs:

Severe Allergy Alert (AA)

A Severe Allergy Alert Service Dog is one that is trained to identify the sources of allergens that can be life threatening for their handler. They can easily recognize tree nuts, shellfish, gluten, and other common sources of allergies.

Autism Assistance

An Autism Assistance Service Dog can help their autistic trainers by grounding them. They employ deep pressure stimulation, which is similar to the tactile stimulation exerted by weighted blankets. If trained, these dogs can also assist in other ways, such as by finding a runner.

Brace/Mobility Support (BMS)

A Brace/Mobility Support Service Dog can serve as a counterbalancing force for their partners. This makes them especially useful for disabled individuals with balance issues. They are also trained to respond to emergencies, such as by retrieving things and opening/closing doors.

Diabetic Alert (DA)

Diabetic Alert Service Dogs can be trained to inform their handler when the latter’s blood sugar level is dangerously high or low. They are also capable of calling 911 when they are unable to rouse their partners.

Medical Alert (MA)

Medical Alert Service Dogs are in charge of warning their handlers of any changes in their physiological condition. Therefore, these animals can monitor levels of blood pressure, specific hormones, etc.

Seizure Response

A Seizure Response Service Dog is trained to respond in certain ways when their handler’s having a seizure. Their training includes using tactile stimulation to prematurely end seizures, retrieving medication, and place a call to 911.

Visual Assistance

As the name suggests, a Visual Assistance Service Dog has been trained to take care of their handler who is either completely blind or visually impaired in some manner. For instance, they can assist their partners in crossing the streets and direct them towards the stairs etc.

Wheelchair Assistance

Wheelchair Assistance Service Dogs are trained to be able to help their wheelchair confined partners in many ways. They can open doors and retrieve dropped objects, making their partners’ lives much easier.

Know someone who could benefit from a service dog in their life? Talk to them and keep a pair of nylon Dog Bones ready as a welcome home gift for the pooch!

Cute Photos @dogtorpaws

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