Things to Consider when Flying with Dogs

If you own a dog, then the thought of a vacation probably fills you with sadness more than glee! That’s because travel can be stressful for animals and it is likely true for your pet as well. Any trips would mean painful farewells and not least because flying with dogs can be difficult. It is also true because you can’t guarantee if the hotel you stay at would be pet-friendly or not. Are you making your dog suffer through the trip only to leave them in the hotel room all day long?

While you can search for dog-friendly hotels on the internet these days, flying with dogs can still be a challenge. That is why we have gathered some tips to make your trip easier both for you and the pooch!

Health Check

First things first, you need to face reality. Travel is stressful and flying even more so. Therefore, avoid flying with your dog whenever it can be avoided. However, if you are moving between states, you might not have any other options. So, how can you make the situation more ideal and comfortable for the both of you? By being as prepared as possible. That includes a health check for your dog. Get one done in the weeks leading up to your flight. The vet will not only give them an overall checkup, they’d also make sure your dog is up to date on their immunizations.

Flight Check

When flying American, it is best to know the rules for taking dogs on a plane. The airlines limit the number of dogs in the cabin to seven per flight. Only two dogs are allowed in the first class cabin, provided they are high class pets. Don’t leave anything to chance when it comes to your precious furry cargo. Call ahead and be ready to pay more than $100.00 fee on each journey. Ensure that you know your pooch meets the size requirements, i.e., they weigh under 20 lbs. because the weight limit includes the carrier. Buy a carrier that will fit snugly under your seat.

Dog Check

Don’t take your dog on a plane if they are easily flustered, scared, or anxiety-prone. Airlines have reported a nervous temperament to be the chief cause of pet injuries while on a flight! Nobody knows your dog the way you do.

Before you force a situation on them that they can’t handle, take a minute to ask yourself if your dog will be all right. Dogs that suffer from claustrophobia or have separation anxiety aren’t good candidates for a flight. Some can display destructive behavior when they are on their own, making them unfit for flying. Pooches that don’t do well when confronted with new places, people, or experiences shouldn’t be flying at all! Canines that remain calm while inside the crate and know they are safe are the ones who should be taken on planes! Would taking Interactive Dog Toys, such as Babble Balls, along help your dog stay calm? Then do so!

Finally, respiratory issues make it improbable for pugs, boxers, and Boston terriers to survive flying.

Environment Check

While each dog is unique, most animals will do better on shorter trips. How they would take to flying will also depend on the environment they are in. Confined spaces and cabins that are too hot or too cold don’t make for good flying.

When you have taken all these factors into account, your pet would have a much better flight. Best of luck!

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