Myths about Animals Adopted from Shelters/Rescue Centers (I)

When you decide to rescue or adopt from a shelter, the first thing you are most likely to do is research on the topic. Most of the information available especially online is misleading and can give you the wrong idea or even dissuade you from going ahead with the whole process. This is because most of the information is based on stereotypes and myths. I intend to debunk these myths in this article and present you with the facts.

The first myth is that there are no young animals in the shelters. This myth might make you change your mind if you had wanted to raise your adopted dog from puppyhood. The truth is that there are many young animals in shelters, but they may require special attention and that is why you do not see them in the shelter with the rest of the older dogs. In case there are no puppies in the shelter/rescue center you have chosen to adopt from, you can always adopt an adult dog. Adult dogs don’t have as many responsibilities as a puppy, and they can also be trained with the right attitude and patience.

Most people think of shelters as a place where mutts and unwanted dogs thrive, so there are likely not any purebreds in the shelters. This is a myth. Research shows that 25 percent of dogs in animal shelters/rescue centers are purebreds. If you are really inclined in adopting a specific breed that suits your lifestyle and you can’t find the breed in the shelter, ask the staff to guide you on how to reach a specific rescue for a specific breed. These breed-specific rescues exist and most shelter staff collaborates with them to match owners and dogs.

Another misconception is that dogs in shelters up for adoption have health issues. This is not entirely true. Yes, the dog might have been rescued from the streets but a vet is required to clear them and give them a clean bill of health before the dog is put up for adoption.

Cute 📷@kayatheshepherd 

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