Jingle X-Tire Balls Single Rope & Tug N Toss

Jingle X-Tire Balls Single Rope & Tug N Toss Tire Ball

Jingle X-Tire Balls Single Rope & Tug N Toss Tire Ball are a pair of small tires ruggedly molded as a single ball with a hollow center tied with rope. Easy for dogs to retrieve.

Jingle X-Tire Balls

Jingle X-Tire Balls

Jingle X-Tire Balls Single Rope & Tug N Toss Tire Ball are a pair of small tires ruggedly molded as a single ball with a hollow center tied with rope. Easy for dogs to retrieve.

AN INVENTIVE FAMILY. Gick was born in Burbank and comes from an inventive family. His dad designed metal tools for leather crafts such as belts and purses. “My dad had one of the nation’s very first hobby shops, back in the 1950s. He was an inventor of the tools used today for leather craft. One day, Charles Tandy of Tandy Corp. came to visit his store and bought my dad out right on the spot,” Gick recalled. The second oldest of four kids, Gick was drafted when he was 19 years old. When Gick returned from the Army, he worked for his father, who had started another company.

That business prospered and grew for 20 years. This business also was sold, leaving Gick to venture out on his own and start up a new company specializing in gift products. “Our headquarters was in the Irvine Spectrum. We initially focused on proprietary craft products and later became a distributor of products for other companies.

After a year of building and testing numerous prototypes, and an initial investment of $500,000. Gick hooked up with a supplier overseas, and in July 2003, he had his first Babble Balls. “The dogs go nuts for the Babble Balls because they think there is an animal inside,” he said. “This isn’t just a regular plush toy, but something more high-tech. Most pets go into a frenzy with them the moment they hear them talk. One consumer said her ferret adopted the little kitty ball and carried it around like a baby. Another lady sent me a picture of her hedgehog playing with one.”

MISTAKES ALONG THE WAY. However, it wasn’t always smooth sailing. Gick said the first set of Babble Balls had a few glitches, like separating at the seams, which cost him about $80,000 to make right. “It wasn’t easy. I ran ads in trade magazines and went to pet trade shows,” he said. “I’m constantly pitching the balls to stores, and I get new customers and reorders every day, but it took me over a year to really get rolling.”